Nuclear Weapons Websites Are In Deep Denial About UFOs

Articles Discussing Documented UFO Incursions at ICBM Sites Are Automatically Rejected

Declassified U.S. government documents confirm that UFOs have repeatedly visited nuclear weapons sites—laboratories, plutonium production plants, bomb test ranges, missile warhead storage depots, ICBM launch silos—as early as December 1948.

Furthermore, KGB and Ministry of Defense documents released or leaked following the collapse of the U.S.S.R. verify that the Soviets also experienced such incursions at their nuclear facilities during the Cold War era.

In short, someone or something operating highly superior aerial craft has been monitoring and sometimes disrupting the functionality of American and Russian nuclear weapons for decades.

Moreover, the situation is quite current. According to U.S. Air Force missile maintenance technicians, a huge, cigar-shaped object was repeatedly sighted on October 23, 2010, as it maneuvered above F.E. Warren Air Force Base's ICBM field. Coincidentially or not, on that date the base could not, for several hours, communicate with (or launch, had the need arisen) 50 of its Minuteman III missiles.

A summary of the startling incident—featuring the initial story about it in The Atlantic, which did not mention the UFO-angle—may be found in my article, Huge UFO Sighted Near Nuclear Missiles During October 2010 Launch System Disruption.

Over the past 38 years I have interviewed nearly 130 U.S. military veterans, most of whom were eyewitnesses to one or more UFO incursions at ICBM sites or Weapons Storage Areas (WSAs). Seven of those individuals spoke at my September 27, 2010 press conference in Washington D.C., which CNN streamed live.

The full-length video of the event.

An article containing the veterans' affidavits as well as a small cross-section of nukes-related documents:
The UFOs-Nukes Connection Press Conference

In 2008, I published a detailed summary of the situation in my 600-page book, UFOs and Nukes: Extraordinary Encounters at Nuclear Weapons Sites, which is still available at my website.

In the three years following the book's publication, I have attempted to interest various nuclear weapons-related websites in publishing articles on the topic of UFOs and nukes, to no avail. My emails to the hosts go unanswered and, with rare exceptions, the blog posts I submit are rejected by the moderators. In short, there is an effective information embargo on this subject at respectable websites where one would predict great interest and debate among the collective readership.

Why is this so? Why is the topic taboo? The information I provide to these websites is drawn either from the declassified documents themselves or based on the verbatim testimony of ex-military personnel who witnessed some of the events described in those files. These are persons who were once entrusted by the U.S. government to operate Weapons of Mass Destruction, who now assert that UFOs repeatedly monitored and sometimes disrupted those key weapons systems.

Surely this authoritative information would be of interest to the experts and laypersons who regularly opine on the many nukes-related sites. Or, at least, one would think so.

The websites in question span the full spectrum, from those sponsored by nuclear proponents, to ones run by disarmament advocates; from technically-oriented sites to philosophical forums. The groups include Bulletin of The Atomic Scientists, Ploughshares Fund, Arms Control Wonk, Nuclear Weapons Free, Citizens For Global Solutions, Nuke Watch New Mexico, The Utopian, Nuclear Age Peace Foundation—to name but a few. So far, all of these have responded to the topic of UFO activity at nuclear sites as they would the plague; it is something to be avoided at all costs.

Again, I ask: Why?

How ironic that these nuclear weapons interest groups endlessly discuss the ins-and-outs of the Nuclear Age—its birth, manifestations, consequences, possible outcomes—but have thus far steadfastly ignored a central element in its existence: According to the declassified files, outside observers, technically-advanced but apparently neither American nor Russian, have doggedly monitored the nuclear arms race and, according to the military witnesses themselves, intermittently injected themselves into its six-decades-long unfolding in a most disturbing and even shocking manner—on both sides of the ocean.

Granted, at the moment, one will not find this dramatic information in the history books. And, were it not for the existence of the Freedom of Information Act, the brave candor of the military veterans involved and, to a lesser degree, the dissolution of the Soviet regime, one would not have an opportunity to review the available data regarding UFOs' longstanding interest in nuclear weapons.

The point, however, is that one does indeed have that opportunity, if one would only set aside the pervasive anti-UFO biases that currently exist, at least for a little while, just long enough to read a few of the documents and witness affidavits.

It is my hope that this brief exposé on the baffling impasse at the nuclear interest forums will prompt a few brave souls at Plowshares, et al, to come to grips with the reality of the situation and to permit a discourse on UFO activity at nuclear weapons facilities to appear at their websites in the future.